The Henry Ford

The Henry Ford (@thehenryford)

Bio:3 must-see attractions. 250 acres of unexpected. 1 awe-inspiring experience. Home to @CBSInnovationTV and @cwinventiontv.

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Join us September 25 for an intimate evening of American poetry and dining set against the beautiful backdrop of Greenfield Village and featuring the mixed-media experience of unconventional contemporary poet Tyehimba Jess. Call our Contact Center at 313-982-6001 to make your reservations.

Join us September 25 for an intimate evening of American poetry and dining set against the beautiful backdrop of Greenfield Village and featuring the mixed-media experience of unconventional contemporary poet Tyehimba Jess. Call our Contact Center at 313-982-6001 to make your reservations.

In the early 1980s Japanese electronics manufacturers began to develop a sense of how to shape American tastes in design, terming their approach "lifestyle design." This 1986 Sharp QT 50 boombox represents the first example of a Japanese electronics firm tapping into the international trend toward postmodernist design. It references 1930s American streamline design, while simultaneously drawing inspiration from 1950s American vernacular design. #NationalRadioDay

In the early 1980s Japanese electronics manufacturers began to develop a sense of how to shape American tastes in design, terming their approach "lifestyle design." This 1986 Sharp QT 50 boombox represents the first example of a Japanese electronics firm tapping into the international trend toward postmodernist design. It references 1930s American streamline design, while simultaneously drawing inspiration from 1950s American vernacular design.  #NationalRadioDay

Montgomery Ward & Company launched America’s first general mail order company. Over 22 years later, their 1894-1895 catalog still proudly trumpeted this fact: “Originators of the Mail Order Business.” #NationalMailOrderCatalogDay

Montgomery Ward & Company launched America’s first general mail order company. Over 22 years later, their 1894-1895 catalog still proudly trumpeted this fact: “Originators of the Mail Order Business.”  #NationalMailOrderCatalogDay

Today's the day! Enjoy free admission to Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation, including access to Star Trek: Exploring New Worlds, thanks to our partners at @Delta.

Today's the day! Enjoy free admission to Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation, including access to Star Trek: Exploring New Worlds, thanks to our partners at @Delta.

#OnThisDay 40 years ago, Astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to walk on the Moon, posed in front of the Wright brothers' home during a 1979 visit to The Henry Ford. Armstrong and his Apollo 11 crewmates took pieces of the 1903 Wright Flyer on their 1969 mission, to emphasize the incredible progress made in the 66 years between Kitty Hawk and the lunar landing. #Apollo50th

 #OnThisDay 40 years ago, Astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to walk on the Moon, posed in front of the Wright brothers' home during a 1979 visit to The Henry Ford. Armstrong and his Apollo 11 crewmates took pieces of the 1903 Wright Flyer on their 1969 mission, to emphasize the incredible progress made in the 66 years between Kitty Hawk and the lunar landing.  #Apollo50th

This flag was at Woodstock, a witness to this legendary event that reflected the 1960s counterculture movement’s quest for freedom and social harmony.

Flags like this one were provided to vendors, musicians, and technical crew to allow them access to the Woodstock Musical Festival grounds at Max Yasgur’s 600-acre dairy farm in upstate New York during the August 1969 event. They were to fly the flag from their vehicles or attach it to their booths.

This flag’s faded and tattered appearance seems to suggest the logistical challenges of Woodstock. But it is more likely that its owner displayed this treasured keepsake for years after--the flag couldn’t fade this much or get this tattered in just three days. Instead, this flag attests to the eternal staying power of Woodstock as a cultural landmark for an entire generation of American youth--and for the nation.  #Woodstock50

This flag was at Woodstock, a witness to this legendary event that reflected the 1960s counterculture movement’s quest for freedom and social harmony. Flags like this one were provided to vendors, musicians, and technical crew to allow them access to the Woodstock Musical Festival grounds at Max Yasgur’s 600-acre dairy farm in upstate New York during the August 1969 event. They were to fly the flag from their vehicles or attach it to their booths. This flag’s faded and tattered appearance seems to suggest the logistical challenges of Woodstock. But it is more likely that its owner displayed this treasured keepsake for years after--the flag couldn’t fade this much or get this tattered in just three days. Instead, this flag attests to the eternal staying power of Woodstock as a cultural landmark for an entire generation of American youth--and for the nation.  #Woodstock50

This "circuit bent" instrument is made from an iconic Speak n' Spell educational toy and currently on display in our latest pop-up exhibit, "Break, Repair, Repeat: Spontaneous & Improvised Design." Circuit benders salvage cheap battery-powered electronics from second-hand stores, open their covers, and make permanent short circuits with jumper wires. Billy Prosise transformed this device in ways that the original manufacturer never intended, allowing sounds to loop, unpredictably glitch, and distort. Our curators found objects in our collection like this one that had been broken, repaired, or created through improvisation—and acquired a few new artifacts along the way. See the exhibit for yourself now through September 15 in Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation.

This "circuit bent" instrument is made from an iconic Speak n' Spell educational toy and currently on display in our latest pop-up exhibit, "Break, Repair, Repeat: Spontaneous & Improvised Design." Circuit benders salvage cheap battery-powered electronics from second-hand stores, open their covers, and make permanent short circuits with jumper wires. Billy Prosise transformed this device in ways that the original manufacturer never intended, allowing sounds to loop, unpredictably glitch, and distort. Our curators found objects in our collection like this one that had been broken, repaired, or created through improvisation—and acquired a few new artifacts along the way. See the exhibit for yourself now through September 15 in Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation.

Our iconic #Moog synthesizer prototype is on the road. Beginning this week during the #Moogseum’s grand opening celebration in Asheville, N.C., (#Moogmentum: Synthesizing Innovation, Music, and Creativity), guests will be able to see the prototype on exhibit. The historic prototype, originally belonging to pioneering synthesist and co-collaborator of the instrument, Herb Deutsch, will be on loan to the @bobmoogfoundation through May 23, 2020.

Our iconic  #Moog synthesizer prototype is on the road. Beginning this week during the  #Moogseum’s grand opening celebration in Asheville, N.C., ( #Moogmentum: Synthesizing Innovation, Music, and Creativity), guests will be able to see the prototype on exhibit. The historic prototype, originally belonging to pioneering synthesist and co-collaborator of the instrument, Herb Deutsch, will be on loan to the @bobmoogfoundation through May 23, 2020.

It’s a championship like no other today and tomorrow in Greenfield Village. Every summer, we commemorate Detroit’s 1867 World Base Ball Tournament with a gathering of teams that play one outstanding weekend of America’s game by those original rules. It is unquestionably the nation’s greatest two-day exposition of historic base ball.

It’s a championship like no other today and tomorrow in Greenfield Village. Every summer, we commemorate Detroit’s 1867 World Base Ball Tournament with a gathering of teams that play one outstanding weekend of America’s game by those original rules. It is unquestionably the nation’s greatest two-day exposition of historic base ball.

Soar into the first 40 years of flight with free admission to Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation (including admission to the limited-engagement exhibit Star Trek: Exploring New Worlds), on August 18 courtesy of @Delta. From the Wright brothers’ historic liftoff to today’s awe-inspiring technological advances, experience the evolution of American aviation firsthand.

Soar into the first 40 years of flight with free admission to Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation (including admission to the limited-engagement exhibit Star Trek: Exploring New Worlds), on August 18 courtesy of @Delta. From the Wright brothers’ historic liftoff to today’s awe-inspiring technological advances, experience the evolution of American aviation firsthand.

As we get ready to wind down our current offering in What We Wore, wedding dresses, we were excited to welcome featured bride Diane Anderson to Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation last month to see her 1990 wedding dress on exhibit. If you haven’t seen our current collection of wedding dresses in What We Wore, make sure to stop by August 14 before our next installation arrives.

As we get ready to wind down our current offering in What We Wore, wedding dresses, we were excited to welcome featured bride Diane Anderson to Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation last month to see her 1990 wedding dress on exhibit. If you haven’t seen our current collection of wedding dresses in What We Wore, make sure to stop by August 14 before our next installation arrives.

Like so many others, we’re saddened to hear the news of Toni Morrison’s passing this week. Morrison’s parents—both from the Deep South—instilled in her a lifelong sense of heritage and a love of traditional African-American folktales, myths, and legends.  Her searing novels, honoring this heritage and incorporating these traditions, played a vital role in bringing black feminist literature to the forefront. This copy of her second novel, Sula (1973), comes from the library of educator Dr. James Buntin, a collection now housed at The Henry Ford. Dr. Buntin’s personal library not only reflects his own passions as an African-American educator but also provides a unique window into the issues, topics, and debates of the Black Power era during the late 1960s and early 1970s—issues that still deeply resonate today.

Like so many others, we’re saddened to hear the news of Toni Morrison’s passing this week. Morrison’s parents—both from the Deep South—instilled in her a lifelong sense of heritage and a love of traditional African-American folktales, myths, and legends. Her searing novels, honoring this heritage and incorporating these traditions, played a vital role in bringing black feminist literature to the forefront. This copy of her second novel, Sula (1973), comes from the library of educator Dr. James Buntin, a collection now housed at The Henry Ford. Dr. Buntin’s personal library not only reflects his own passions as an African-American educator but also provides a unique window into the issues, topics, and debates of the Black Power era during the late 1960s and early 1970s—issues that still deeply resonate today.

Today begins National #FarmersMarketWeek, a week dedicated to highlighting the importance of farmers markets in communities across the country. From our digital collections is this 1948 postcard depicting the Original Farmer's Market in Hollywood, California. The market began in 1934 when a dozen farmers sold produce out of their trucks to local residents. Permanent stalls soon replaced the trucks and by the late 1940s -- this postcard's date -- the Farmer's Market had become a favorite place for Hollywood stars, out-of-town tourists, and local families to meet, eat, and shop.

Today begins National  #FarmersMarketWeek, a week dedicated to highlighting the importance of farmers markets in communities across the country. From our digital collections is this 1948 postcard depicting the Original Farmer's Market in Hollywood, California. The market began in 1934 when a dozen farmers sold produce out of their trucks to local residents. Permanent stalls soon replaced the trucks and by the late 1940s -- this postcard's date -- the Farmer's Market had become a favorite place for Hollywood stars, out-of-town tourists, and local families to meet, eat, and shop.

Day two of #makerfairedetroit is on a roll...

Day two of  #makerfairedetroit is on a roll...

It’s time for a story with @levar.burton at #makerfairedetroit! Day 1 is off to an amazing start.

It’s time for a story with @levar.burton at  #makerfairedetroit! Day 1 is off to an amazing start.

How does an 18th century teapot with a repaired spout relate to a hacked Speak n’ Spell?

Spontaneous design can be as trivial as using duct tape to fix a broken car bumper—or as critical as building a temporary survival shelter.

A new pop-up exhibit, Break, Repair, Repeat: Spontaneous & Improvised Design is the result of a collaboration between Curator of Decorative Arts Charles Sable and Curator of Communication & Information Technology Kristen Gallerneaux. The pair looked deeply into The Henry Ford’s collections, finding objects that had been broken, repaired, or created through improvisation—and acquired a few new artifacts along the way.

Some objects in this exhibit have been altered many times, have led multiple lives, and served various purposes. They have been intentionally modified to serve very specific practical needs, or to share an artistic vision. Just in time for #MakerFaireDetroit, you can see it for yourself this weekend in Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation.

How does an 18th century teapot with a repaired spout relate to a hacked Speak n’ Spell? Spontaneous design can be as trivial as using duct tape to fix a broken car bumper—or as critical as building a temporary survival shelter. A new pop-up exhibit, Break, Repair, Repeat: Spontaneous & Improvised Design is the result of a collaboration between Curator of Decorative Arts Charles Sable and Curator of Communication & Information Technology Kristen Gallerneaux. The pair looked deeply into The Henry Ford’s collections, finding objects that had been broken, repaired, or created through improvisation—and acquired a few new artifacts along the way. Some objects in this exhibit have been altered many times, have led multiple lives, and served various purposes. They have been intentionally modified to serve very specific practical needs, or to share an artistic vision. Just in time for  #MakerFaireDetroit, you can see it for yourself this weekend in Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation.

#Apollo11: Our latest pop-up exhibit in Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation celebrates #Apollo50th and @nasa during the 1960s: One Giant Leap for Mankind. See it for yourself today and throughout the summer in the museum.

 #Apollo11: Our latest pop-up exhibit in Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation celebrates  #Apollo50th and @nasa during the 1960s: One Giant Leap for Mankind. See it for yourself today and throughout the summer in the museum.

There was a time when outer space belonged to the realm of fantasy and science fiction. Through movies, radio, television, comic strips and comic books, kids cheered as fantasy space heroes like Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers and Tom Corbett-Space Cadet safeguarded Earth’s inhabitants from evil forces. Futuristic space toys proliferated, from atomic ray guns and wind-up robots to toy spaceships. Then something happened. The United States and the Soviet Union began to explore outer space for real. When the Russians launched Sputnik I in October 1957, the “space race” took off, leading to a new era of more realistic space toys. 
The Henry Ford’s collection of space-themed banks, dating from 1949 to 1964 including this Plan-It bank from 1959, captures the span of these two perceptions of outer space — as just a fantasy world to being a real place into which humans ventured. These mechanical banks, produced by #Detroit-based companies Duro Mold & Manufacturing and Astro Manufacturing, were offered at individual bank branches as incentives for kids to start bank accounts. Having the branch bank’s name affixed to the front of one of these futuristic coin collectors was a sure sign that the financial institution was modern, progressive and in step with the times. #Apollo11 #Apollo50th

There was a time when outer space belonged to the realm of fantasy and science fiction. Through movies, radio, television, comic strips and comic books, kids cheered as fantasy space heroes like Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers and Tom Corbett-Space Cadet safeguarded Earth’s inhabitants from evil forces. Futuristic space toys proliferated, from atomic ray guns and wind-up robots to toy spaceships. Then something happened. The United States and the Soviet Union began to explore outer space for real. When the Russians launched Sputnik I in October 1957, the “space race” took off, leading to a new era of more realistic space toys. The Henry Ford’s collection of space-themed banks, dating from 1949 to 1964 including this Plan-It bank from 1959, captures the span of these two perceptions of outer space — as just a fantasy world to being a real place into which humans ventured. These mechanical banks, produced by  #Detroit-based companies Duro Mold & Manufacturing and Astro Manufacturing, were offered at individual bank branches as incentives for kids to start bank accounts. Having the branch bank’s name affixed to the front of one of these futuristic coin collectors was a sure sign that the financial institution was modern, progressive and in step with the times.  #Apollo11  #Apollo50th

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